WEIRDEST SCHOOL RULES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

WEIRDEST SCHOOL RULES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Rules have to be in place in schools so that order is maintained. But some places just go overbroad in their creation of rules and standards. Here are some unbelievable school rules from around the world!

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1. No Luck For You!

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Japan is known for having some of the strictest school rules in the world, and their students are more disciplined than in other countries. It seems that Japan’s spiritual beliefs and superstitions transpire into their school rules. In the fact that students are not allowed to wear more than one good luck bracelet. Any more than one is considered to be a form of cheating!

2. Illegal Sauce

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In France, Ketchup is illegal in school cafeterias. This is due to French teenagers using so much ketchup in their school lunches that they compromise the integrity of traditional French cuisine, rendering it “Too American”. The law was put into place by Christopher Hebert, The president of the national association of municipal catering managers. However, if someone does order a side of fries, they can have a small serving of ketchup. But that serving is not to be used in any other way.

3. Gender Inclusiveness!

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In Nebraska, Lincoln Public Schools decided to eliminate terms like “BOY” and “GIRL” for the sake of wanting transgender students to feel more included. This means that teachers and students can’t use gender-specific terms, but instead use names or neutral terms like “Campers”, “Students”, “Kids”, etc. Parents weren’t thrilled with the rules, saying that it was policing social interaction rather than educating students.

4. Free Toy

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Schools are traditionally seen as a toy-free zone so that students can focus on their studies. But in Germany, on the first day of first grade, students have to participate in the tradition of schultute, in which each student is given a cone full of toys and candy to celebrate “The Seriousness of Life”. Some kids have even been known to receive a videogame or a cellphone in their cone! Perhaps they are trying to give the kids a last chance to be a kid before they have to grow up.

5. No Red

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Teachers in parts of the United Kingdom and Australia have found themselves in a situation where they are no longer allowed to grade their students’ papers using red ink. Why? The colour red is seen as confrontational and threatening, thus resulting in school children getting upset when they receive their graded work. Instead, teachers have to use more soothing colours like blue, purple, yellow, or even pencil.

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